Science in the News

Post date: August, 28 2013

Developer: National Geographic Society      

Price: Free

Recommended age: 7+...

Did you know ketchup was originally sold as medicine? Or that an elephant’s tooth can weigh as much as a bowling ball? It’s weird… but true! No, really, National Geographic’s Weird but True mobile app lets you discover wacky information about science and learn strange statistics. Rate each fact on the Weird-o-Meter, and check back daily for newly added facts!

Post date: July, 10 2013

cut the rope review by the saint louis science centerDeveloper: ZeptoLab

Price: free

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Players use critical thinking skills and logic to cut the dangling rope and retrieve the candy. Each level can be solved in multiple ways, which encourages players to experiment to arrive at the best solution. In Cut the Rope, failing a level is not necessarily a failure, it just provides another opportunity to try something new. Players will learn physics and how different objects are affected by...

Post date: June, 25 2013

NASA App reviewDeveloper: NASA Ames Research Center    

Price: Free

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Blast off into a world of knowledge with this free educational app from NASA! Learn from NASA experts about current and previous missions, track orbits, and stream live NASA television. With nine categories full of interesting facts, transport yourself to another galaxy of information that is updated daily.

Post date: June, 14 2013

Developer: Disney 

Price: Free

Recommended age: 6+

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Swampy isn’t your typical alligator. Living deep below the city in a drain, Swampy is friendly and prefers to be clean. The other alligators have damaged the pipes, and Swampy needs your help to fix the water flow to his shower! Swipe away mud and grime to figure out the puzzle and create a clear path for water to Swampy’s bath tub. Watch out for increasing amounts of algae, poison and ooze threatening Swampy’s...

Post date: May, 31 2013

View original release.

WASHINGTON -- In preparation for a future where parts and tools can be printed on demand in space, NASA and Made in Space Inc. of Mountain View, Calif., have joined to launch equipment for the first 3-D microgravity printing experiment to the International Space Station.

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3-D printing in space could be a game changer for space exploration and colonization. In preparation for a future where parts and tools can be printed on demand in space, NASA and Made in Space Inc. of Mountain View, Calif., have joined to launch equipment for the first 3-D microgravity printing experiment to the International Space Station.

Post date: May, 6 2013

Newswise — WASHINGTON – Fossil remains found by a George Washington University biologist in northwestern China have...

Fossil remains found by a George Washington University biologist in northwestern China have been identified as a new species of small theropod, or meat-eating, dinosaur.

Post date: April, 2 2013

Newswise — As the shapes of galaxies go, the spiral disk — with its characteristic pinwheel profile — is by far the most pedestrian.

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As the shapes of galaxies go, the spiral disk — with its characteristic pinwheel profile — is by far the most pedestrian. Our own Milky Way, astronomers believe, is a spiral. Our solar system and Earth reside somewhere near one of its filamentous, swept-back arms. And nearly 70 percent of the galaxies closest to the Milky Way are spirals, suggesting they have taken the most ordinary of galactic forms in a...

Post date: February, 28 2013

Experiments with tadpoles show ectopic eyes that "see"

Newswise — For the first time,...

For the first time, scientists have shown that transplanted eyes located far outside the head in a vertebrate animal model can confer vision without a direct neural connection to the brain. Tufts University biologists used a frog model to shed new light – literally – on one of the major questions in regenerative medicine and sensory augmentation research.

Post date: February, 12 2013

WASHINGTON, Feb. 12, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NASA engineers have demonstrated the agency's Orion spacecraft can land safely if one of its three main parachutes fails to inflate during deployment.

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The test was conducted Tuesday in Yuma, Ariz., with the parachutes attached to a test article. Engineers rigged the parachutes so only two would inflate, leaving the third to flag behind, when the test capsule was dropped from a plane 25,000 feet above the...

Post date: February, 12 2013

Newswise — ANN ARBOR — Ancient carbon trapped in Arctic permafrost is extremely sensitive to sunlight and, if exposed...

Ancient carbon trapped in Arctic permafrost is extremely sensitive to sunlight and, if exposed to the surface when long-frozen soils melt and collapse, can release climate-warming carbon dioxide gas into the atmosphere much faster than previously thought.

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